Addition and Extension in English Sentence: the simple short block method

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Addition and Extension in English Sentence: the simple short block method

I always maintain a rule: Don’t extend or expand your sentence too much. A sentence is a vehicle of an image, meaning, emotion, and many more things.

So I try to keep it as short as possible; so that each block carries its own meaning. I try to add those blocks in a decoupled way. The advantage is when one block gets corrupted, the other block does not get affected.

How we could try this technique?

Let me present a list first.

  • Addition and Extension: and.
  • Contrast: but, however.
  • Alternative: or
  • Cause: because
  • Time: when, while.

Let me present a few sentences using complex and compound structures.

A boy, named Rajanya, fell in love with a girl, named Nilopher; they decided to leave their village together after three days, which would be Sunday, a holiday. Nilopher’s cousin Farid knew the whole story because he had been a close friend of Rajanya, in fact, primarily he had acted upon as the mediator between them; although, Farid did not like this relationship from the core of his heart.

I have checked this text in Grammarly, and found this report:

  • This text scores better than 99% of all text checked by Grammarly where comparable goals were set.
  • Your text compares in readability to The New York Times. It is likely to be understood by a reader who has at least a 10th-grade education (age 16).
  • The readability score: 46

It was OK. But, not satisfactory. It has got readability score – 46. Now, I will try to make it, at least, above 60. Let me try.

Let me try to write the same text applying the simple short-block-method.

Rajanya fell in love with Nilopher.
They decided to leave their village together after three days. It would be Sunday, a holiday.
Nilopher’s cousin Farid knew the whole story. Farid had been a close friend of Rajanya. Primarily he had acted upon as the mediator between them.
Although, Farid hated this relationship from the core of his heart.

I checked it on Grammarly. Here is the report:

  • This text scores better than 97% of all text checked by Grammarly where comparable goals were set.
  • Your text is likely to be understood by a reader who has at least an 8th-grade education (age 13-14) and should be fairly easy for most adults to read.
  • The readability score: 64

Now, it is your turn to judge. Which one is better.

About sanjibsinha

Sanjib Sinha (sometimes, he uses his full family name, Sanjib Deb Sinha) is an author, IT Consultant, and an independent researcher. As a certified .NET developer he Won Microsoft Community Contributor Award in 2011. He has written many books covering a wide range of topics, such as Security Programming, Algorithm, Data Structures, Software Designs, Discrete Mathematics, etc, using different programming languages, such as, C, C++, PHP, C#, ASP.NET, Python, Laravel, Dart, and Java. For learning purpose you may contact the author at: sanjib12sinha@gmail.com Sanjib Sinha has written Beginning Laravel 5.8 (two editions), Beginning Ethical Hacking with Python, Beginning Ethical Hacking with Kali Linux, Bug Bounty Hunting for Web Security, and A Quick Start Guide to Dart Programming for Apress.

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